Saturday, June 25, 2005

Demolished


Chavez Ravine Tonight I am levelled, floored by this awesome new album by Ry Cooder. Here's the blurb on Amazon.com, and you'll know why I already liked it even before I heard one track:
Album Description Ry Cooder's Chavez Ravine is-a post-World War II-era American narrative of "cool cats," radios, UFO sightings, J.Edgar Hoover, red scares, and baseball.Using real and imagined historical characters, Cooder and friends creates an album that recollects various aspects of the poor but vibrant hillside Chicano cummunity, which was bulldozed by developed in the interest of "progress." Chavez Ravine back Ry Cooder might have been tempted to bill this as the Chavez Ravine Social Club. After generating such popular and critical interest in Cuban music of decades past with the Buena Vista Social Club, Cooder applied a similar approach closer to home, extending his fascination with the Mexican-American culture that flourished in 1940s and '50s Los Angeles. The result is an CD that sounds like it's aspiring to be something far more ambitious: a DVD, a theatrical production, even a time machine. Cooder and a cast of seminal Chicano artists present a song cycle that conjures an era of UFOs, the Red Scare, and political machinations that leveled the Chavez Ravine barrio to lure the Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles. In his celebration of a vibrant community that doesn't know it's on the verge of displacement, Cooder enlists Thee Midnighters vocalist Little Willie G. (whose songwriting collaboration with Los Lobos's David Hidalgo on "Onda Callejara" highlights the album). and Pachuco patriarchs Don Tosti and Lalo Guerrero, with the latter reviving his dancefloor favorite "Los Chucos Suaves." The accordion of Flaco Jimenez adds conjunto flavor to "Barrio Viejo." Throughout the album, Cooder plays a typically tasteful, understatedly virtuosic guitar, assumes a variety of vocal roles--including a cool Chet Baker homage in duet with pianist Jacky Terrason on "In My Town"--and provides the provocative social context. --Don McLeese
Onda Callejera from the album "Chavez Ravine" by Ry Cooder

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3 Comments:

Blogger C.flava said...

cool, i'll check the album out--- btw--- got any old chinese jazz samples for me to mess with? :)

6/25/2005 01:25:00 PM  
Blogger Mr Miyagi said...

Yes, gort some old Shanghainese jazz standards.

6/25/2005 07:03:00 PM  
Blogger airhole said...

sometimes i feel i shouldn't even read you blog.. cos you make me buy CDs...

damn Ry Cooder's work is always interesting.. thanks for the heads up... tho my wallet points a dirty sign at you. :P

6/27/2005 01:45:00 PM  

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